?

Log in

No account? Create an account
DT: come reap
Posted on 2004.22.02 at 14:45
Soundtrack: Annie Lennox- Stay By Me
Sorry for even more spam, but I had to share this:

"I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people and I should stick to the issue of racial justice. But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King Jr. said, 'Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.' I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream to make room at the table of brother- and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people."

---Corretta Scott King, speaking in 1998.

Exerpt lifted from this post in gay_marriage. There are a lot of interesting links here. Go read!

I'd also like input on what people think about the GLBT civil rights movement vs the (still ongoing) civil rights movement of people of colour. I agree with this poster. I think there are a lot of similarities.

Comments:


the day you left was just my beginning
patchfire at 2004-02-22 12:08 (UTC) ()
Well, you know how I feel about it, darling. :) But I'll ramble on anyway.

I think there are enormous similiarities when any group is fighting injustice to other groups that have done the same. There may be differences in the details, yes, but the essential thrust and underlying motivations are nearly the same, if not exactly so.

MLK Jr., writing in 1963, said "For hundreds of years the quiet sobbing of an oppressed people had been unheard by millions of white Americans - the bitterness of the Negroes' lives remote and unfelt except for a sensitive few. Suddenly last summer the silence was broken. The lament became a shout and then a roar and for month no American, white or Negro, was insulated or unaware. The stride toward freedom lengthened and accelerated into a gallop, while the whole nation looked on." This was in reference to the summer of 1963, written in late 1963/early 1964 and published in Why We Can't Wait. And isn't that the best title? Why We Can't Wait. Because asking any group to wait until someone is 'comfortable' with whatever the group is entitled to - in some ways, it's worse than opposing them altogether. Anyway, the quote. I think that if certain details were changed, it's very appropos for what's happening now.

The most hopeful thing, though, about now, that I think parallels, in some respects, the civil rights movement, is that your Average Joe Schmoe on the streets is becoming desensitized. They see all these gays and lesbians getting married and they're starting to be like "oh, another gay wedding. next channel." But the weddings had to happen before they would get there. There were still segrationists in the south after Brown v. Board of Education, and even 15 years later. But some racists were desensitized, and they kept their mouth shut after awhile. Were they still wrong? Sure. Were they hurting anyone but themselves with their thoughts? No.

I want to write emails to my state representatives, reminding them that gay marriage is coming, and twenty or thirty years from now, their children or grandchildren will ask them where they stood, and won't they be embarassed to admit that they were wrong?
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2004-02-22 12:46 (UTC) ()

Re:

Oh, it's coming, all right. I'm really doubting that there'll be a Federal Marriage Amendment; It's very, very hard to change the US Constitution.

I'm really encouraged to hear Mrs. King speak out; I wonder what Rosa thinks. She's what, ninetysomething? *g*
dejaspirit at 2004-02-22 18:28 (UTC) ()
There are a lot of similarities, but one big difference. Being Gay or Lesbian is a hidden minority. A Gay or Lesbian person who isn't out will usually be assumed straight and therefore not be descriminated against unless they out themselves somehow.

Of course, the injustice is the same. I shocks me to see how many African American people are anti - gay.

(Deleted comment)
dejaspirit at 2004-02-22 19:19 (UTC) ()

Re:

The black church. I'm torn in my feelings towards the black church, which I find can be both inspiring and crippling to a black community all at the same time. I will have to think on that topic and make an intelligent post about it one of these days.

But that's pretty much it. It's religion.
let's get the seven lines.
bookshop at 2004-02-23 06:40 (UTC) ()

Re:

Right. I completely agree that the rhetoric of people being used to discriminate is nearly exactly the same now as it was in the 60's, and you know, the thing is that I can understand how history could repeat itself--but I'm utterly amazed that it's repeating itself this quickly.

Let me just quote Kash here:
There were still segrationists in the south after Brown v. Board of Education, and even 15 years later. But some racists were desensitized, and they kept their mouth shut after awhile. Were they still wrong? Sure. Were they hurting anyone but themselves with their thoughts? No.

In the South, the racist attitudes of many citizens hasn't gone away. It's not everybody who joins the KKK, no, but there is this constant and steady undercurrent in the South of the thing everybody's not saying, but everybody knows. The feeling of resentment at the Other is still incredibly strong in the South: resentment at the North, resentment at Liberals, resentment at non-European Americans, and especially resentment at African-Americans for what is perceived as being the huge handouts the government has given them (by 'giving "them" welfare') at the expense of white Southern jobs and white Southern dignity.

I can't help but feel that there's a lot of leftover resentment for all these things fueling the conservative movement to ban gay marriage. It's not just gays and lesbians that Southern conservatives see themselves as fighting; it's a mentality of forced change, forced acceptance of Otherness that encroaches on their culture and society, that has constantly been driving them back into a corner for nigh on a century and a half.

I completely agree with Dionne (my housemate and I were discussing this the other day) that racial identity isn't something that can be hidden, whereas sexual identity is. But that's largely the perspective of those fighting *for* gay rights--in terms of those fighting against it, I think the logic and the rhetoric involved is almost identical to that being used 40 years ago.

Kelly, do you still want to start a fandom activist community, or sort of use the fandom to mobilize action in the gay_marriage and queer_marriage communities that already exist?
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2004-02-23 08:36 (UTC) ()

Re:

Whatever the fandom wants. I'm up for either. O fandom, my fandom? Whaddya say?
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2004-02-22 19:06 (UTC) ()
Being Gay or Lesbian is a hidden minority.

I've heard this said before, and It's true. African-Americans don't have the luxury of the closet.


It shocks me to see how many African American people are anti - gay.

Do you have any idea why this might be so? I was thinking maybe values based on religious beliefs (like quite a few white people), but I really have no idea.
Previous Entry  Next Entry