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DT: come reap
Posted on 2004.24.02 at 09:16
How I feel about it all: amusedamused
Soundtrack: Tom Lehrer - New Math



You can't take three from two,
Two is less than three,
So you look at the four in the tens place.
Now that's really four tens,
So you make it three tens,
Regroup, and you change a ten to ten ones,
And you add them to the two and get twelve,
And you take away three, that's nine.
Is that clear?

Now instead of four in the tens place
You've got three,
'Cause you added one,
That is to say, ten, to the two,
But you can't take seven from three,
So you look in the hundreds place.

From the three you then use one
To make ten ones...
(And you know why four plus minus one
Plus ten is fourteen minus one?
'Cause addition is commutative, right.)
And so you have thirteen tens,
And you take away seven,
And that leaves five...

Well, six actually.
But the idea is the important thing.

Now go back to the hundreds place,
And you're left with two.
And you take away one from two,
And that leaves...?

Everybody get one?
Not bad for the first day!

Hooray for new math,
New-hoo-hoo-math,
It won't do you a bit of good to review math.
It's so simple,
So very simple,
That only a child can do it!
Now that actually is not the answer that I had in mind, because the book that I
got this problem out of wants you to do it in base eight. But don't panic. Base
eight is just like base ten really - if you're missing two fingers. Shall we
have a go at it? Hang on.

You can't take three from two,
Two is less than three,
So you look at the four in the eights place.
Now that's really four eights,
So you make it three eights,
Regroup, and you change an eight to eight ones,
And you add them to the two,
and you get one-two base eight,
Which is ten base ten,
And you take away three, that's seven.

Now instead of four in the eights place
You've got three,
'Cause you added one,
That is to say, eight, to the two,
But you can't take seven from three,
So you look at the sixty-fours.

"Sixty-four? How did sixty-four get into it?" I hear you cry.
Well, sixty-four is eight squared, don't you see?
(Well, you ask a silly question, and you get a silly answer.)

From the three you then use one
To make eight ones,
And you add those ones to the three,
And you get one-three base eight,
Or, in other words,
In base ten you have eleven,
And you take away seven,
And seven from eleven is four.
Now go back to the sixty-fours,
And you're left with two,
And you take away one from two,
And that leaves...?

Now, let's not always see the same hands.
One, that's right!
Whoever got one can stay after the show and clean the erasers.

Hooray for new math,
New-hoo-hoo-math,
It won't do you a bit of good to review math.
It's so simple,
So very simple,
That only a child can do it!

Comments:


my life's so common it disappears
songdog at 2004-02-24 20:30 (UTC) ()
But you do know that 2 + 2 = 5...for extremely large values of 2...
my life's so common it disappears
songdog at 2004-02-24 20:45 (UTC) ()
Zack wrote a program called Funidecimal. It translates between base 36 and decimal (I think)

All characters 0-9 and a-z
Not case sensitive
A=a
And its a number system
just like hexidecimal
So you can have a number for a name
And inversely your name is a number

Say we had bob
The first b is 11 * 1
Cause 36^0 is 1
The o is some other number and you'd multiply its value by 36
the b is 11 again and you would multiply 11 by 36^2
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2004-02-25 04:28 (UTC) ()
Isaac is fascinated by funidecimal. He translates into bases all the time. Tell Zack to expect many questions upon the next meeting.

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