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DT: come reap

Quote of the Day

Posted on 2003.28.03 at 08:30
How I feel about it all: touchedtouched
Soundtrack: Clips from NYC Riverside Church Rally on WBAI New York
From my hero:

"The Americans are forcing even their friends into becoming their enemies. It is curious that the Americans, who calculate so carefully on the possibilities of military victory, do not realize that in the process they are incurring deep psychological and political defeat. The image of America will never again be the image of revolution, freedom and democracy, but the image of violence and militarism." -- Martin Luther King, Jr.

It's amazing how his words still ring.


Last night I listened to "ECHOES OF MARTIN LUTHER KING'S "BEYOND VIETNAM":
AN EVENING OF RESISTANCE TO THE WAR ON IRAQ"
on WBAI New York. I wish I could have been there in person for this event, which was held at the historic Riverside Church in New York.

The list of speakers was phenomenal:

Michael Moore, Academy Award winning director, "Bowling for Columbine"
Ossie Davis, actor, writer, director
Pete Seeger, folksinger
Sapphire, poet, novelist
Amy Goodman, "Democracy Now!"
Camille Yarbrough, singer, poet
Ron Daniels, Executive Director, Center for Constitutional Rights
Leslie Cagan, Co-Chair, United for Peace and Justice
Don Rojas, General Manager, WBAI
Tom Chapin, folksinger
Andre Gregory, actor, director
Malachy McCourt, activist, author, actor
Rev. Herbert Daughtry, Pastor, The House of the Lord Pentecostal Church
National Public Address, singer/actors
Fabian, poet
Rev. Dr. James A. Forbes, Jr., Senior Pastor, The Riverside Church
Mona Younis, author, international human rights activist
Iman Faiz Khan
V/Tek, Hip-Hop Artists Against the War
Monifa Bandele, activist, Malcolm X Grassroots Movement
Cornelius Eady, poet, Pulitzer Prize winning playwright
Inspirational Choir of The Riverside Church
Dr. Tracy West, Prof. of Christian Ethics & African American Studies, Drew U.
Marinieves Alba, activist, Student Voices for Peace
Rabbi Arthur Waskow, Rabbi, Shalom Center
Jeremy Glick, September 11 Families for a Peaceful Tomorrow
Marie Ponsot, Poet
Sara Flaunders, International ANSWER
Three Sopranos, singers
Rev. Dr. James Fitzgerald, Mission and Social Justice Commission



Pete Seeger was there. Wonderful, heroic, funny, determined Pete Seeger. Eighty-four years old, obviously frail, he strummed his guitar with hands that don't work as well as they used to. In his wavering, aged, beautiful voice, he sang "Where have all the flowers gone?" and then introduced a new song, managing in his infectious way to get the whole audience singing along, and managed to make me cry, and sing along too, all by myself at home. I couldn't love him more. If there were such a thing as secular canonization, I'd be right there wearing my pro-Pete button. Saint Peter, indeed. *loves*

Comments:


Rakshi
rakshi at 2003-03-28 09:14 (UTC) ()
I have adored Pete Segar since his days with the Weavers and on Seseme Street.. singing to my children, who now have their own children. I sang "Where Have All The Flowers Gone' during the Vietnam War and cried. And "Little Boxes" is one of the first songs I learned to play on the guitar.

I'm with you. St. Peter.. he's my man.

just dance
karabou at 2003-03-28 09:22 (UTC) ()
Oh man... Tom Chapin makes the most excellent childrens music. I have few of his cds, I used to listen to them constantly when I was a little girl. I still do sometimes.
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2003-03-29 08:47 (UTC) ()
I meant to tell you how much I love your icon.
just dance
karabou at 2003-03-29 11:03 (UTC) ()
Aw, thanks.. :)
peacey at 2003-04-08 04:04 (UTC) ()

Hmmmm...

"The Americans are forcing even their friends into becoming their enemies...."

And their enemies into their friends? Sometimes people grow out of friendships and sometimes new ones develop. Kinda nice to see a persecuted, tortured, and repressed people taking their first, hesitant tastes of freedom. Don't you think?

"...do not realize that in the process they are incurring deep psychological and political defeat."

Hmmmm. Psychological defeat? What does that mean? Let's say I'm a simpleton who sees this war as ridding the world of a despicable, tyranical, despot who terrorizes his own people. Explain how ridding the world of someone like this is supposed to make me feel defeated. And political defeat? Please. Politics, schmolitics. Pffft. Talk to Kerry about political defeat. Regime change of a constitutionally elected president? Jackass.

"The image of America will never again be the image of revolution, freedom and democracy, but the image of violence and militarism."

Shall we ask the Iraqi people if they feel this way after they realize they no longer have to fear Saddam?

Sorry about the attitude. The quote kinda got my blood up.
try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2003-04-09 04:23 (UTC) ()

Re: Hmmmm...

There you are, I've been wondering where you went! I miss you :D.



I think that the Iraqi people will eventually be fine. Unlike a lot of my fellows in the peace movement, I believe that the US government has the interest of the people of Iraq at heart. I applaud their efforts to avoid sacred sites and civilians,although I think that there are a lot more civilians being killed than we're being told about--I get this from reading/listening to stories in the foriegn press (not the Iraqi minister of misinformation, that guy couldn't lie his way out of a paper bag, although he tries like crazy to do it).

Yeah, I think that Saddam going is a Very Good Thing, and I think it'll be good for the people of Iraq in the long run. I think we're breaking international law to do it, and I think that there are other Evil Guys out there that we haven't gone after because our business interests don't run in that direction.

By deep and psychological defeat, I mean that our whole attitude toward the rest of the world is changed. We decided to start the war with very few backers, including the UN, who IMO should have had a role in this decision. Bad Evil Guy or not, I'm pretty sure that going into a country pre-emptively is illegal. I probably should find the actual wording in International law before I spout that, though. You keep me honest, honey :D. I also have a BIG problem with cluster bombs, but that's another discussion.

Dr. King was speaking about Vietnam. He was right. A lot of people were for that war at the time, as well. I believe in my heart that he was killed for speaking out against it.


Kinda nice to see a persecuted, tortured, and repressed people taking their first, hesitant tastes of freedom. Don't you think?

Absolutely. It's a good thing that the Iraqis will be free of Saddam. I just think the way it was done was wrong. I'm kind of scared that terrorism in this country will increase rather than decrease, because even though Saddam wasn't the darling of the Arab world (to say the least), the West in general, and the US in particular are considered an even bigger evil by many countries. I hope that the transition to an Iraqi government is done in a way so as not to look like an occupation. I don't think it is an occupation. I'm an odd peacenik; I don't follow Party Lines.

I'm kind of afraid that after this war is over (and thank God it's looking like it's winding down) we'll go and attack some other country with a Big Evil Guy, and another, and so on. My babies are at the cannons over there, and it's scary.


I'm glad you commented. Don't ever feel you can't. I don't have to agree with you politically to love you dearly.

I'm just glad you didn't go after my Pete. Then I'd get all medieveal on yer arse. (I am kidding. Honest.)








try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
primroseburrows at 2003-04-09 04:25 (UTC) ()

Re: Hmmmm...

And dang if I didn't spell "medieval" wrong.

There.
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